What are Endocrine and Medtabolic Disorders?

Endocrine disorders are diseases related to the endocrine glands of the body. The endocrine system produces hormones, which are chemical signals sent out, or secreted, through the bloodstream. Hormones help the body regulate processes, such as appetite, breathing, growth, fluid balance, feminization and virilization, and weight control.

 

A metabolic disorder affect the body’s ability to process certain nutrients and vitamins. They can happen when abnormal chemical reactions in the body alter the normal metabolic process. It can also be defined as inherited single gene anomaly, most of which are autosomal recessive.

 

There are many different kinds of metabolic and endocrine disorders, including:

Hyperlipidemia

Hyperlipidemia is abnormally elevated levels of any or all lipids and/or lipoproteins in the blood. It is the most common form of dyslipidemia. Lipids (water-insoluble molecules) are transported in a protein capsule. The size of that capsule, or lipoprotein, determines its density. The lipoprotein density and type of apolipoproteins it contains determines the fate of the particle and its influence on metabolism.

Hypogonadism

Hypogonadism means diminished functional activity of the gonads—the testes in males or the ovaries in females—that may result in diminished sex hormone biosynthesis. In teens, hypogonadism may delay puberty or cause incomplete or lack of normal development. In adults, hypogonadism may alter certain masculine physical characteristics and impair normal reproductive function. Hypogonadism can also cause mental and emotional changes. As testosterone decreases, some men may experience symptoms similar to those of menopause in women.

Orthostatic hypotension

Orthostatic hypotension is a fall in systolic blood pressure when a person assumes a standing position. It occurs predominantly by delayed constriction of the lower body blood vessels, which is normally required to maintain an adequate blood pressure when changing position to standing. As a result, blood pools in the blood vessels of the legs for a longer period and less is returned to the heart, thereby leading to a reduced cardiac output and can lead to fainting with a possibility of injury.