What are Endocrine and Medtabolic Disorders?

Endocrine disorders are diseases related to the endocrine glands of the body. The endocrine system produces hormones, which are chemical signals sent out, or secreted, through the bloodstream. Hormones help the body regulate processes, such as appetite, breathing, growth, fluid balance, feminization and virilization, and weight control.

 

A metabolic disorder affect the body’s ability to process certain nutrients and vitamins. They can happen when abnormal chemical reactions in the body alter the normal metabolic process. It can also be defined as inherited single gene anomaly, most of which are autosomal recessive.

 

There are many different kinds of metabolic and endocrine disorders, including:

Hyperlipidemia

Hyperlipidemia is abnormally elevated levels of any or all lipids and/or lipoproteins in the blood. It is the most common form of dyslipidemia. Lipids (water-insoluble molecules) are transported in a protein capsule. The size of that capsule, or lipoprotein, determines its density. The lipoprotein density and type of apolipoproteins it contains determines the fate of the particle and its influence on metabolism.

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period. Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger. If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications. Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, nonketotic hyperosmolar coma, or death. Serious long-term complications include heart disease, stroke, chronic kidney failure, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.

Hypocalcaemia

Hypocalcaemia is low calcium levels in the blood Mildly cases that develop slowly often have no symptoms but in more extreme cases symptoms may include numbness, muscle spasms, seizures, confusion, or cardiac arrest.